BK Put Big Macs in its Ads This Year; Top Stunts of the Year: Thursday’s First Things First

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Welcome to First Things First, Adweek’s new daily resource for marketers. We’ll be publishing the content to First Things First on Adweek.com each morning (like this post), but if you prefer that it come straight to your inbox, you can sign up for the email here.

Burger King Claims There Was a Hidden Big Mac in Every Whopper Ad From This Year

Which is bigger, a Whopper or a Big Mac? Burger King UK doesn’t just want to tell you it’s the winner, it wants to show you. By sneaking a Big Mac into ads all year long—but hiding them behind its own bigger sandwich—the fast food chain pulled off yet another clever stunt when it “revealed” the hidden Big Macs in another ad. The spot, created by BBH London, is in line with Burger King’s trolling antics: its relentlessly teasing McD’s about the whole clown mascot thing and put its rival in an awkward position with a proposition to create a mashup charity burger called the McWhopper. And BK’s newest strategy? Bigger is better.

Read more: BBH London’s chief creative officer called it “one of the most fun ideas we have ever executed.”

The Top 15 Stunts and Innovations of 2019

There are innumerable ways to categorize ads, and at the end of the day, it can be tough to choose a best one when there are so many different ways that a creative piece can be great. With that in mind, Adweek’s Ian Zelaya wanted to give a shoutout to the most innovative marketing stunts that brands pulled this year. He writes about more than a dozen sneaky stunts, from a jar of maybe-pee that was tweeted out by Vita Coco to a book of tampons to—of course—Popeyes Sunday relaunch for its infamous chicken sandwich.

Read more: Also featuring a Skittles musical, the hacking of 3D-printed gun designs and furniture that’s easier for visually-impaired people to navigate.

Super Saturday Numbers Show the Strength of Offline Retail

While it might feel like literally everything has gone online these days, customers still do a good amount of their holiday shopping IRL, according to new data from Square. In fact, online only accounted for 9% of sales for retailers with both an online and offline presence. The data also showed an increased emphasis on Black Friday, and that it wasn’t actually Super Saturday (Panic Saturday?) that was the biggest shopping day in December. Instead, it was Dec. 7. Maybe the panic started early this year.

Read more: Black Friday sales were up 33% from an average Friday in November.

Infographic: Are the Holidays Bad for the Planet?

According to a new study by U.K. brand Beyond the Box, 62% of consumers believe the holiday season is bad for the planet. The statistic isn’t really surprising, considering a growing public concern for the climate and an increasing response by brands looking to attach their names with a purpose-driven focus. Taking this into account, Adweek’s Robert Klara laid out a few pointers for brands and regular folks alike to address consumer concerns related to climate change. Holiday decorators and partiers can swap out a fake tree for a real one—or just refrain from buying a new artificial one. Garland and ornaments, both often made of plastic, can also be swapped out for more sustainable alternatives. When it comes to lights, choose LEDs, which use a tenth of the electricity and last a whopping 50 times longer.

Read more: Each holiday season, Americans use 38,000 miles of ribbon.

Best of the Rest:

Ad of the Day: Kylian Mbappé Shows Why He Could be the Next Face of Nike Soccer in New Spot

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